Key Point: California AG Becerra’s investigation into security flaws in the Glow fertility app results in a settlement agreement that resembles recent enforcement agreements in New York but is also unique in requiring the app’s developer to consider gender-specific concerns within its privacy-by-design principles.

“When you meet with your doctor or healthcare provider in person, you know that your sensitive information is protected. It should be no different when you use healthcare apps over the internet,” according to California’s Attorney General Becerra. The consequences of not having the appropriate data protections? It means “a digital disclosure of your private medical records is instantaneously and eternally available to the world” per Becerra.

For these reasons, especially in the new era of telemedicine, developers of medical applications (health app) understand that consumers’ privacy and security must be protected. “Excuses are not an option,” Becerra warns. California’s settlement agreement with Upward Labs Holdings, Inc. (Upward Labs) and its subsidiary Glow, Inc. (Glow), is an example that Becerra’s warning should not be ignored.


Continue Reading Settlement Agreement With Health App Developer Part of Emerging Trend But Adds Unique Gender-Based Requirement

Keypoint: As of January 1, 2020, manufacturers of IoT devices will need to comply with new laws in California and Oregon.

It may be hard to believe but the California Consumer Privacy Act is not the only new law that will go into effect on January 1, 2020. Rather, new laws in California and Oregon that regulate IoT devices also will go into effect on that date. Below is an overview of those laws.


Continue Reading Two New State IoT Laws Go into Effect on January 1