Conceptual image about how a laptop computer with internet open a virtual door to worldwide information sharing.Keypoint: Maryland lawmakers have introduced a bill that would allow Maryland residents to opt-out of certain types of personal information transfers but that would stop far short of creating CCPA-like rights for Maryland residents.

On January 17, 2020, Maryland House Delegates Courtney Watson and Ned Carey introduced HB0249. If enacted in its current form, the bill would allow Maryland residents to opt-out of certain types of transfers of their personal information to third parties. However, it would not create other CCPA-like privacy rights such as the right to deletion and would not require businesses to make disclosures regarding their privacy practices.

Maryland joins a growing list of states considering consumer privacy legislation, including Florida, Illinois, Virginia, Washington state, Nebraska, New Jersey, New Hampshire, and Hawaii. Members of Husch Blackwell’s privacy and data security practice group will be hosting a webinar on February 4 at noon CST to discuss these proposed laws and to provide an update on the CCPA. To register, click here.

Below is our analysis of the Maryland legislation (as introduced).

To Whom Does it Apply?

“Consumers,” which is defined as an individual who resides in Maryland.

What Entities are Covered?

The Act would apply to “businesses” which is defined as entities that (1) are organized or operated for the profit or financial benefit of their shareholders or other owners; (2) collect the personal information of consumers; and (3) satisfy one of the following thresholds: (a) have annual gross revenues in excess of $25,000,000; (b) annually buy, receive for their commercial purposes, sell, or share for commercial purposes, alone or in combination, the personal information of 100,000 or more consumers, households or devices; or (c) derive at least 50% of their annual revenues from selling consumers’ personal information. The definition also includes entities that control or are controlled by a business and that share a name, service mark, or trademark with that business.

What Information is Covered?

“Personal information,” which is defined as “information that reasonably identifies, relates to, describes, or could be linked to, directly or indirectly, a particular consumer, household or consumer’s device.” Personal information does not include information that is lawfully made available from federal, state or local government records or de-identified or aggregate consumer information.

What Rights are Created?

Consumers would have the right to demand that a business not disclose the consumer’s personal information to third parties.

The bill defines “disclose” broadly to mean a transfer of “personal information by a business to a third party, including selling, renting, releasing, disseminating, making available, transferring, or otherwise communicating by any means.” It exempts transfers to “service providers [if] necessary to the performance of an operational purpose,” transfers to third parties to effectuate an opt-out request, and transfers to third parties as part of an asset sale.

In turn, the bill defines “service provider” somewhat similar to the CCPA’s definition as “an entity that processes personal information disclosed by a business or on behalf of a business in accordance with a written contract if the contract prohibits the entity receiving the information from: (1) retaining, using, or disclosing the personal information for any purpose other than for the specific purpose of performing the services specified in the contract for the business, or as otherwise allowed by [the bill]; and (2) combining the personal information with personal information received by the entity from another source.”

In contrast to the CCPA, which was amended in 2019 to allow businesses to offer financial incentives to consumers in exchange for the collection of their personal information (aka Loyalty Programs) under certain conditions, this practice would apparently not be allowed in Maryland. As introduced, the bill would prohibit businesses from charging different prices or rates, including the use of discounts or other benefits, against consumers who exercised their right to opt-out.

The bill also would prohibit businesses from disclosing the personal information of consumers to third parties if the business has actual knowledge of or willfully disregards the fact that the consumer is under 18 years old.

Are there Any Exemptions?

No. As introduced, the bill does not contain any exemptions such as exemptions for GLBA and HIPAA-regulated entities.

Would Companies Need to Update their Online Privacy Policies?

No, but businesses would need to provide a link on their homepages to a webpage that enables consumers to submit requests. As initially drafted, the bill apparently would require all businesses to have such a link, regardless of whether they transfer personal information that would be subject to the right to opt-out.

How Would it be Enforced?

Violations would constitute an unfair or deceptive trade practice under Maryland’s Consumer Protection Act, which allows actions to be brought by the Division of Consumer Protection, the Maryland Attorney General and individuals who sustain a loss due to the prohibited practice.

When Would it be Effective?

January 1, 2021

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Photo of David Stauss David Stauss

David is leader of Husch Blackwell’s national privacy and cybersecurity practice group. He routinely counsels clients on responding to data breaches, complying with privacy laws such as GDPR and the California Consumer Privacy Act, and complying with information security statutes. He also…

David is leader of Husch Blackwell’s national privacy and cybersecurity practice group. He routinely counsels clients on responding to data breaches, complying with privacy laws such as GDPR and the California Consumer Privacy Act, and complying with information security statutes. He also represents clients in data security-related litigation. David is certified by the International Association of Privacy Professionals as a Privacy Law Specialist, Certified Information Privacy Professional (US), Certified Information Privacy Technologist, and Fellow of Information Privacy.

Photo of Erik Dullea Erik Dullea

A member of Husch Blackwell’s Technology, Manufacturing & Transportation team, Erik focuses on administrative/regulatory law, with an emphasis on heavily regulated industries and government contractors. He represents mine operators in MSHA enforcement actions, energy and industrial companies in OSHA enforcement actions, and advises…

A member of Husch Blackwell’s Technology, Manufacturing & Transportation team, Erik focuses on administrative/regulatory law, with an emphasis on heavily regulated industries and government contractors. He represents mine operators in MSHA enforcement actions, energy and industrial companies in OSHA enforcement actions, and advises airlines and their pilots challenging FAA and DOT enforcement actions. Erik advises government contractors on transactional matters, bid protests and civil litigation. He holds an active security clearance and has 20 years of experience in the aviation industry as both a Navy pilot and a commercial pilot. Erik is a co-chair of Husch Blackwell’s Unmanned Aircraft Systems practice group.

Photo of Malia Rogers Malia Rogers

Clients of all sizes – from innovative startups to Fortune 500 corporations – value Malia’s counsel on a broad range of privacy and cybersecurity issues, including incident response in times of emergency. She advises clients on privacy compliance planning, which encompasses cybersecurity measures…

Clients of all sizes – from innovative startups to Fortune 500 corporations – value Malia’s counsel on a broad range of privacy and cybersecurity issues, including incident response in times of emergency. She advises clients on privacy compliance planning, which encompasses cybersecurity measures as well as drafting breach response and action plans.