data privacyKey Point:  On October 1, 2019, the amendments to Nevada’s privacy policy statute will go into effect, requiring entities subject to the statute to revise their online privacy policies and create an internal process to ensure compliance with the new opt-out right.

As we initially discussed back in May, the Nevada legislature recently amended

data privacyKey Point:  Although not as far-reaching as the CCPA, the Nevada legislation will require entities subject to the statute to revise their online privacy notices and create an internal process to ensure compliance with the new opt-out right.

As we previously reported, the Nevada legislature has been considering legislation to amend Nevada’s existing online privacy notice statutes, NRS 603A.300 to .360. On May 23, 2019, the Nevada Assembly unanimously passed that legislation. The Senate previously passed it in April. The legislation is now headed to the Governor’s office for signature.

The legislation amends Nevada’s law in two notable ways. First, entities subject to the statute will need to establish a designated request address through which consumers can submit verified requests directing the entity not to make any “sale” of covered information collected about consumers. That provision will be enforceable only by the Nevada Attorney General’s office which can seek an injunction or $5,000 penalty for “each violation.” Second, the legislation excludes financial institutions subject to the Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act, HIPAA covered entities, and certain motor vehicle manufacturers from having to comply with the online privacy notice statute.


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data privacyAs we first reported in February, the Nevada legislature has been considering legislation that would amend its online privacy notice statutes, NRS 603A.300 to 360. Among other things, Nevada’s existing law requires “operators” to provide a notice to consumers that (1) identifies the types of information the operator collects online, (2) describes the process (if any) for consumers to review or request changes to their information, (3) describes the process by which the operator notifies consumers of changes to the notice, and (4) discloses whether a third party may collect covered information about an individual’s online activities over time and across different Internet websites or online services.

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One of the myriad of issues arising from the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) is the extent to which financial institutions subject to the Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act (GLBA) must comply with the CCPA’s requirements in light of Section 1798.145(e), which provides that the CCPA “shall not apply to personal information collected, processed, sold, or disclosed pursuant to [the GLBA], and implementing regulations.” Because the CCPA’s definition of “personal information” is broader than the GLBA’s definition of “nonpublic personal information,” financial institutions have been faced with the daunting task of not only data mapping but also classifying that data based on whether it is subject to the GLBA. 
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You can add Nevada to the growing list of the states that are considering privacy-related legislation in the wake of last year’s enactment of the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA). Nevada is one of three states that already require certain entities to provide online privacy notices to disclose the types of personal information that they collect from consumers. Senate Bill 220 would supplement that existing law by allowing consumers to submit notices to businesses directing them not to sell any personal information the business has collected or will collect about the consumer (i.e., an opt-out). An entity that receives such a notice would be forbidden from selling the consumer’s personal information.
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