UPDATE: The below post discusses whether the Washington Privacy Act is still alive notwithstanding that the House failed to pass the bill prior to the April 11 deadline. In a tweet, bill sponsor Reuven Carlyle stated: “The bill remains alive through the end of the Legislative Session.”

Keypoint: This week bills in Florida and Connecticut continued to progress, the Washington Privacy Act failed to get out of the House at the deadline, and bills in Oklahoma and West Virginia died.

Below is our seventh weekly update on the status of proposed CCPA-like privacy legislation. Before we get to our update, we wanted to provide two reminders.

First, we have been regularly updating our 2021 State Privacy Law Tracker to keep pace with the latest developments. We encourage you to bookmark the page for easy reference.

Second, the contents provided below are time-sensitive and subject to change. If you are not already subscribed to our blog, consider doing so to stay updated.


Continue Reading Status of Proposed CCPA-Like State Privacy Legislation as of April 12, 2021

Keypoint: It was another busy week with developments in Washington, Florida, Oklahoma, Alaska, Nevada, and Rhode Island.

For the sixth week in a row, we are providing an update on the status of proposed CCPA-like privacy legislation. Before we get to our update, we wanted to provide three notes.

First, we are pleased to announce the results of our poll on whether to call Virginia’s new privacy law – the Virginia Consumer Data Protection Act – the CDPA or VCDPA. By an overwhelming 85-15% margin readers prefer VCDPA to CDPA.

Second, we have been regularly updating our 2021 State Privacy Law Tracker to keep pace with the latest developments. We encourage you to bookmark the page for easy reference.

Third, the contents provided below are time-sensitive and subject to change. If you are not already subscribed to our blog, consider doing so to stay updated.


Continue Reading Status of Proposed CCPA-Like State Privacy Legislation as of April 5, 2021

Keypoint: There were a number of notable developments this week: the Washington Privacy Act passed out of a house committee after adding a private right of action, there was more movement on the Florida and Connecticut bills, and Nevada lawmakers introduced companion bills that would expand the state’s right to opt out of sales.

For the fifth week in a row, we are providing an update on the status of proposed CCPA-like privacy legislation. Before we get to our update, we wanted to provide three reminders.

First, there has been so much debate about what to call Virginia’s new privacy law – the Virginia Consumer Data Protection Act – that we started an online poll. Tell us whether you think the law should be called the CDPA or VCPDA. We will keep voting open until April 2 and release the results on our blog.

Second, we have been regularly updating our 2021 State Privacy Law Tracker to keep pace with the latest developments. We encourage you to bookmark the page for easy reference.

Third, the contents provided below are time-sensitive and subject to change. If you are not already subscribed to our blog, consider doing so to stay updated.


Continue Reading Status of Proposed CCPA-Like State Privacy Legislation as of March 29, 2021

Keypoint: Proposed bills would amend Nevada privacy legislation to provide consumers with a broader right to opt out of sales.

In 2019 – shortly after the CCPA was enacted – Nevada amended its online privacy notice statutes, NRS 603A.300-360, to provide consumers with the right to opt out of sales. However, contrary to the CCPA’s broad definition of “sale,” the Nevada law defines sale narrowly as “the exchange of covered information for monetary consideration by the operator to a person for the person to license or sell the covered information to additional persons.”


Continue Reading Nevada Bills Would Broaden State’s Right to Opt-Out of Sale of Covered Information

data privacyKey Point:  On October 1, 2019, the amendments to Nevada’s privacy policy statute will go into effect, requiring entities subject to the statute to revise their online privacy policies and create an internal process to ensure compliance with the new opt-out right.

As we initially discussed back in May, the Nevada legislature recently amended

data privacyKey Point:  Although not as far-reaching as the CCPA, the Nevada legislation will require entities subject to the statute to revise their online privacy notices and create an internal process to ensure compliance with the new opt-out right.

As we previously reported, the Nevada legislature has been considering legislation to amend Nevada’s existing online privacy notice statutes, NRS 603A.300 to .360. On May 23, 2019, the Nevada Assembly unanimously passed that legislation. The Senate previously passed it in April. The legislation is now headed to the Governor’s office for signature.

The legislation amends Nevada’s law in two notable ways. First, entities subject to the statute will need to establish a designated request address through which consumers can submit verified requests directing the entity not to make any “sale” of covered information collected about consumers. That provision will be enforceable only by the Nevada Attorney General’s office which can seek an injunction or $5,000 penalty for “each violation.” Second, the legislation excludes financial institutions subject to the Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act, HIPAA covered entities, and certain motor vehicle manufacturers from having to comply with the online privacy notice statute.


Continue Reading Nevada Legislature Passes Bill Allowing Residents to Opt-Out of Sales of Covered Information

data privacyAs we first reported in February, the Nevada legislature has been considering legislation that would amend its online privacy notice statutes, NRS 603A.300 to 360. Among other things, Nevada’s existing law requires “operators” to provide a notice to consumers that (1) identifies the types of information the operator collects online, (2) describes the process (if any) for consumers to review or request changes to their information, (3) describes the process by which the operator notifies consumers of changes to the notice, and (4) discloses whether a third party may collect covered information about an individual’s online activities over time and across different Internet websites or online services.

Continue Reading Nevada Senate Passes Watered-Down Online Privacy Bill