Recently, I counseled an employer regarding the termination of a high level HR employee. The termination wasn’t fun but the company’s termination process was followed. Unfortunately, that was the problem. The employer collected and turned off the exiting employee’s company badge. The employer took the same actions for the corporate credit card. The exiting employee’s laptop was collected and IT was informed to shut down the individual’s access to all systems immediately.

Continue Reading Recycling Business Phones: Not Always Great for <I>Your</I> Environment

Semper Fidelis is the U.S. Marines’ motto – “always faithful.” Perhaps an ironic twist of phrase in the context of its recent and preventable data breach. Let’s recap. The Marine Forces Reserve recently announced that personal information of over 21,000 Marines, sailors, and civilians were “compromised.” The PI included social security numbers, bank account and routing numbers, card information, name, address and other contact information. In other words, PI which is a treasure trove for identity thieves. Some of the PI may have been redacted in part. How did this breach occur? The culprit was an e-mail incorrectly sent with an unencrypted attachment. The email was sent out by the Defense Travel System which manages travel itineraries and expense reimbursement. Obviously sensitive location information is also in play. Probably not a big thing for a travelling salesperson, but highly problematic for defense sector travel.

Continue Reading <I>Semper Fi</I>: Learning From The Marines’ Data Breach

On February 27, 2018, the Supreme Court heard arguments in United States v. Microsoft Corp., a case that will decide whether a digital communications provider has to comply with a U.S. search warrant for user data that is stored outside of the U.S. U.S. v. Microsoft could have major consequences for digital privacy and international data sharing, especially for the cloud-computing industry.

Continue Reading <I>U.S. v. Microsoft</I>: Is Your Data and Privacy at Risk?

St. Louis was named after Louis IX (born in 1214!), hosted a World Fair (technically, the 1904 Louisiana Purchase Exposition), the fleur-de-lis is ubiquitous, and we love soccer and football, although we have neither major league football nor soccer teams (St. Louis FC, our USL minor league soccer team, has a crest which features, you guessed it, a fleur-de-lis). However, St. Louis is known as the “Gateway to the West” – directionally away from Europe. Every once in a while, St. Louisans, like the rest of America, need to heed to what is going on over the pond, particularly when it comes to privacy and data security developments. Below is a brief update on a few foreign issues to begin the New Year.

Continue Reading Forget Me, Forget Me Not: What’s New (Nouveau, Nuevo, Neu…) EU?

It’s time for year-behind-us reminisces and year-before-us prognostications and, for those of us with nothing better to do during the last few days of 2017 and first few days of 2018, attention turns to HIPAA enforcement. So what happened and what can we look forward to? If past is prologue, expect the sound of silence as there was nominal Office for Civil Rights (OCR) activity in 2017 and, with the one noisy exception, no actions to cause your ears to burn.

Continue Reading HIPAA New Year!

Europe’s data protection rules will undergo their biggest change in two decades when the new General Data Protection Regulation (“GDPR”) goes into effect on May 25, 2018. The GDPR replaces the current Data Protection Directive and imposes uniform data security requirements on all EU members. While the GDPR is “an evolution, not a revolution” for data protection, there are several significant changes for which companies should be prepared.

Continue Reading Ready or Not, It’s Coming: Preparing for the GDPR

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), an organization created by Congress to assure safe and healthful working conditions for working men and woman, declared on Friday, August 25, 2017 that what was believed to be a data breach by the Department of Homeland Security, was incorrect. The false alarm breach was related to data included in Injury Tracking Applications (ITA), which organizations must submit electronically to report injury or illness. Husch Blackwell attorneys, Erik Dullea and Matt Diehr, provide insight into this issue and background on the whether the data in an ITA is properly protected.

The advice we always give to clients regarding privacy policies is: “say what you do and do what you say.” It seems simple, but simplicity can be deceiving. Companies want to reassure consumers that their personal data is safe and secure; however, in today’s world, no one can make fail-safe representations of security. Uber’s recent settlement with the FTC illustrates this problem.

Continue Reading Don’t Make “Uber” Promises You Can’t Keep

These days a data security plan should be treated as a top priority for all businesses. In the United States, the law dictates that businesses must secure any non-public third-party data it possesses which makes data security no longer a choice, but rather a legal obligation. Andrew Schlidt, a member of Husch Blackwell’s Data Privacy, Security & Breach Response team, give tips on how to comply with data security laws by implementing a “Written Information Security Plan” or “WISP.” The resourceful information is outlined in the “Legal Login” piece by IB Madison.